Skip Navigation
List Price: $213.18

Rent Book

Select for Price
Add to Cart Free Shipping
There was a problem. Please try again later.

New Book

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Book

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Handbook of Petrochemicals Production Processes,9780071410427

Handbook of Petrochemicals Production Processes

by
Edition: 1st
Format: Hardcover
Pub. Date: 12/2/2004
Publisher(s): McGraw-Hill Education
Availability: This title is currently not available.

Summary

Supported by some of the largest petrochemical and petroleum companies in the world, this unique handbook provides the secrets to the latest in licensed petrochemical technology for some of the most economically important chemicals used throughout the world Process chemistry and thermodynamics are covered for each major processing unit as applicable.

Author Biography

Robert Meyers earned his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from UCLA, was a post-doctoral fellow at Cal Tech and manager of chemical processes for TRW. He has published in Science and the Journal of the American Chemical Society as well as Chemical Engineering, written or edited 12 scientific books and holds more than 20 chemical patents. His research has been reviewed in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Chemical Engineering. A more detailed biography appears in Who's Who in the World.

Table of Contents

Contributors xix
Preface xxi
Acknowledgments xxiii
Part 1 Acetic Acid
Chapter 1.1. Chiyoda Acetic Acid Process ACETICA®
Yasuo Hosono and Minoru Tasaki, P.E.
1.3(1)
Introduction
1.3(1)
Chemistry
1.4(1)
Process Features
1.7(1)
Process Description
1.7(1)
Product Specifications
1.11(1)
Process Yield and Emissions
1.11(1)
Economics of the Chiyoda ACETICA Technology
1.11(1)
Scope of Chiyoda's Package of Services
1.12(1)
Experience
1.12(1)
References
1.13(1)
Part 2 Aniline
Chapter 2.1. DuPont KBR Aniline Process
Eric W. Wong and Ronald Birkhoff
2.3(1)
Introduction 2.3
Aniline Market Overview
2.4(1)
Process Chemistry
2.5(1)
Process Description
2.5(1)
Technology Features
2.6(1)
Operating Requirements
2.7(1)
Product Quality
2.7(1)
Wastes and Emissions
2.7(1)
References
2.8(1)
Part 3 1,3-Butadiene
Chapter 3.1. BASF Butadiene Extraction Technology
Robert Brummer
3.3(1)
Introduction
3.3(1)
Process Perspective
3.3(1)
Process Description
3.4(1)
Economics
3.7(1)
Environmental Considerations
3.8(1)
Summary of Process Features
3.8(1)
Chapter 3.2. UOP KLP 1,3-Butadiene from Acetylene Process
Steve Krupa, Tim Foley, and Stephen McColl
3.11(1)
Introduction
3.11(1)
Butadiene
3.11(1)
The KLP Process
3.12(1)
Process Chemistry
3.12(1)
Commercial Experience
3.13(1)
Economics and Operating Costs
3.13(1)
Part 4 Cumene
Chapter 4.1. ABB Lummus Global Cumene Production via CDCumene® Technology
Stephen Pohl and Sanjeev Ram
4.3(1)
Introduction
4.3(1)
Process Perspective
4.4(1)
Process Chemistry 4.4
Process Description
4.4(1)
Process Economics
4.7(1)
Summary of Process Features
4.9(1)
Chapter 4.2. UOP Q-Max™ Process
Gary A. Peterson and Robert J. Schmidt
4.11(1)
Introduction
4.11(1)
Process Chemistry
4.12(1)
Description of the Process Flow
4.14(1)
Feedstock Considerations
4.15(1)
Process Perfomance
4.18(1)
Case Study
4.18(1)
Commercial Experience
4.19(1)
Bibliography
4.19(1)
Part 5 Ethylbenzene
Chapter 5.1. Lummus UOP Liquid-Phase EBOne Process and CDTECH EB® Process
Stephen Pohl and Sanjeev Ram
5.3(1)
Introduction
5.3(1)
Process Perspective
5.4(1)
Process Chemistry
5.4(1)
Process Description
5.5(1)
Economics
5.9(1)
Summary of Process Features
5.12(1)
Chapter 5.2. Polimeri Europa Ethylbenzene Process
Fabio Assandri and Elena Bencini
5.13(1)
Introduction
5.13(1)
Description of the Process Flow
5.16(1)
Process and Catalyst Advanced Features
5.20(1)
Process Performance
5.21(1)
Commercial Experience
5.21(1)
Chapter 5.3. ExxonMobil Badger Ethylbenzene Technology
Brian Maerz and C. Morris Smith
5.23(1)
Introduction
5.23(1)
Ethylbenzene Manufacturing
5.23(1)
Properties of Ethylbenzene
5.25(1)
EBMax Process Catalysts
5.26(1)
Process Chemistry and EBMax Catalyst Performance
5.28(1)
Process Description
5.31(1)
Process Design Customization and Optimization
5.33(1)
EBMax Process Designs for Dilute Ethylene Feedstocks
5.33(1)
Technology Conversion and Capacity Expansion with EBMax
5.34(1)
Ethylbenzene Product Quality
5.35(1)
Raw Materials and Utilities Consumption
5.37(1)
Catalyst Requirements
5.37(1)
EBMax Plant Design
5.38(1)
Reference
5.38(1)
Part 6 Ethylene
Chapter 6.1. ABB Lummus Global SRT® Cracking Technology for the Production of Ethylene
Sanjeev Kapur
6.3(1)
Introduction
6.3(1)
Development and Commercial History
6.4(1)
Process Chemistry
6.5(1)
Cracking Heater
6.8(1)
Ethylene Process Flow Schematic
6.11(1)
Refinery and Ethylene Plant Integration
6.15(1)
Recent Technology Advances
6.16(1)
Commercial Operations
6.19(1)
Economic Aspects
6.19(1)
Chapter 6.2. Stone & Webster Ethylene Technology
Colin P. Bowen
6.21(1)
Introduction
6.21(1)
Economic Drivers
6.21(1)
Development History: Pyrolysis
6.23(1)
Development History: Recovery
6.27(1)
Process Description
6.29(1)
Megaplant Design Issues
6.44(1)
Project Execution Aspects
6.47(1)
References
6.49(1)
Chapter 6.3. KBR SCORETM Ethylene Technology
Steven Borsos and Stephen Ronczy
6.51(1)
Development and History
6.51(1)
Selective Cracking Furnace Technology
6.52(1)
Optimum Recovery-Section Design
6.57(1)
Future Developments
6.63(1)
Part 7 Methanol
Chapter 7.1. Lurgi MegaMethanol® Technology
Alexander Frei
7.3(1)
History
7.3(1)
MegaMethanol Technology
7.4(1)
Process Description
7.5(1)
Latest Lurgi Methanol Project References
7.17(1)
Part 8 Oxo Alcohols
Chapter 8.1. Johnson Matthey Oxo Alcohols Process™
Jane Butcher and Geoff Reynolds
8.3(1)
Introduction
8.3(1)
Process Description
8.3(1)
Process Flowsheet
8.7(1)
Benefits of the Johnson Matthey Technology
8.9(1)
Feed Specifications
8.10(1)
Process Economics
8.12(1)
Capital Costs
8.12(1)
Operational Experience
8.13(1)
Reference
8.13(1)
Part 9 Phenols and Acetone
Chapter 9.1. Polimeri Europa Cumene-Phenol Processes
Maurizio Ghirardini and Maurizio Tampieri
9.3(1)
Introduction
9.3(1)
Cumene Technology
9.3(1)
Phenol Technology
9.8(1)
Chapter 9.2. Sunoco UOP Phenol Process
Robert J. Schmidt
9.13(1)
Introduction
9.13(1)
Cumene Production
9.13(1)
Phenol Production
9.14(1)
Sunoco UOP Cumene Peroxidation Route to Phenol Production
9.15(1)
Overall Process Description Chemistry
9.15(1)
Process Flow and Recent Technology Advances
9.16(1)
Conclusion
9.28(1)
References
9.29(1)
Chapter 9.3. KBR Phenol Process
Alan Moore and Ronald Birkhoff
9.31(1)
Introduction
9.31(1)
History
9.31(1)
Markets
9.32(1)
Process Chemistry
9.34(1)
Process Description
9.36(1)
Feedstock and Product Properties
9.41(1)
Production Yields
9.43(1)
Utility Requirements
9.43(1)
Product Storage and Shipping
9.43(1)
Environmental Features
9.44(1)
Safety
9.45(1)
Operating Economics
9.46(1)
Investment Economies of Scale
9.46(1)
Acetone Netback
9.48(1)
Technology Advantages
9.49(1)
Bibliography
9.50(1)
Chapter 9.4. QBIS™ Process for High-Purity Bisphenol A
Ed Fraini, Don West, and George Mignin
9.51(1)
Overview
9.51(1)
Commercial Experience
9.56(1)
Wastes and Emissions: Expected Performance
9.57(1)
Part 10 Propylene and Light Olefins
Chapter 10.1. Lurgi MTP® Technology
Waldemar Liebner
10.3(1)
Introduction
10.3(1)
Process Overview
10.3(1)
Detailed Process Description
10.4(1)
Products, By-Products, Wastes, and Emissions
10.9(1)
Technical and Commercial Status
10.10(1)
Process Economics
10.11(1)
Bibliography
10.13(1)
Chapter 10.2. UOP Hydro MTO Process
Peter R. Pujadó and James M. Andersen
10.15(1)
Introduction
10.15(1)
MTO Technology
10.18(1)
Economic Basis
10.20(1)
Investment Estimates
10.20(1)
Economic Comparisons
10.23(1)
Economic Sensitivity
10.25(1)
Conclusions
10.26(1)
References
10.26(1)
Chapter 10.3. UOP Oleflex™ Process
Joseph Gregor and Daniel Wei
10.27(1)
Introduction
10.27(1)
Process Description
10.27(1)
Dehydrogenation Plants
10.29(1)
Propylene Production Economics
10.31(1)
Chapter 10.4. ABB Lummus Global Propylene Production via Olefins Conversion Technology
Catherine A. Berra and James T.C. Wu
10.35(1)
Introduction
10.35(1)
Development and Commercial History
10.36(1)
Process Chemistry
10.37(1)
Process Description
10.37(1)
Process Economics
10.38(1)
Summary of Process Features
10.40(1)
Conclusion
10.41(1)
Chapter 10.5. Propylene via CATOFIN® Propane Dehydrogenation Technology
V.K. Arora
10.43(1)
Introduction
10.43(1)
Process Chemistry
10.44(1)
Process Description
10.44(1)
Process Economics
10.47(1)
Feedstock and Utility Consumption
10.47(1)
Product Quality and By-Products
10.47(1)
Catalyst and Chemical Consumption
10.49(1)
Environmental Emissions
10.49(1)
Summary of Technology Features
10.49(1)
Part 11 Styrene
Chapter 11.1. Lummus UOP "Classic" Styrene Technology and Lummus UOP SMARTSM Styrene Technology
Stephen Pohl and Sanjeev Ram
11.3(1)
Introduction
11.3(1)
Process Perspective
11.4(1)
Process Chemistry
11.5(1)
Process Descriptions
11.6(1)
Economics
11.9(1)
Summary of Process Features
11.11(1)
Chapter 11.2. Stone & Webster (Badger) Styrene Technology
Vincent Welch
11.13(1)
Introduction
11.13(1)
Styrene Industry
11.13(1)
Use of Styrene Monomer
11.14(1)
Properties
11.15(1)
Styrene Manufacturing
11.15(1)
Process Chemistry
11.16(1)
Process Description 11.18
Product Specification
11.23(1)
Operating Economics
11.23(1)
Chapter 11.3. Polimeri Europa Styrene Process Technology
Leonardo Trentini and Armando Galeotti
11.25(1)
Introduction
11.25(1)
Process Chemistry
11.26(1)
Description of the Process Flow
11.27(1)
Process and Mechanical Design Advanced Features
11.32(1)
Process Performance
11.33(1)
Commercial Experience
11.34(1)
Part 12 Terephthalic Acid
Chapter 12.1. E PTA: The Lurgi/Eastman/SK Process
Frank Castillo-Welter
12.3(1)
Introduction
12.3(1)
Chemistry Overview and Product Specification
12.4(1)
Process Description
12.4(1)
Highlights and Benefits of E PTA Technology
12.9(1)
Economics of E PTA Technology
12.10(1)
Commercial Experience
12.11(1)
Part 13 Xylenes
Chapter 13.1. ExxonMobil PxMaxSM p-Xylene from Toluene
Terry W. Bradley
13.3(1)
Introduction
13.3(1)
Process Chemistry
13.4(1)
Process Description
13.5(1)
Operating Performance
13.5(1)
PxMax Retrofit and Debottleneck Applications
13.7(1)
Aromatics Complex and PxMax Unit Description
13.8(1)
Case I: Grassroots PxMax Unit
13.8(1)
Case II: Retrofit of Selective TDP to PxMax
13.11(1)
Case III: Retrofit of Nonselective TDP to PxMax
13.12(1)
Conclusion
13.13(1)
Chapter 13.2. ExxonMobil XyMaxSM Xylene Isomerization
Terry W. Bradley
13.15(1)
Introduction
13.15(1)
Process Chemistry
13.16(1)
Process Description
13.17(1)
Operating Performance
13.18(1)
XyMax Cycle Length
13.20(1)
Commercial Experience
13.21(1)
Chapter 13.3. UOP Parex™ Process for p-Xylene Production
Scott E. Commissaris
13.23(1)
Introduction
13.23(1)
Parex versus Crystallization
13.23(1)
Process Performance
13.26(1)
Feedstock Considerations
13.26(1)
Description of the Process Flow
13.26(1)
Equipment Considerations
13.28(1)
Case Study
13.29(1)
Commercial Experience
13.29(1)
Bibliography
13.30(1)
Part 14 Polyethylene
Chapter 14.1. Basell Spherilene Technology for LLDPE and HDPE Production
Maurizio Dorini and Gijs ten Berge
14.3(1)
General Process Description
14.3(1)
Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics
14.3(1)
Spherilene Process Perspective
14.7(1)
Process Description
14.8(1)
Products and Applications
14.10(1)
Process Economics
14.12(1)
Chapter 14.2. Borstar LLDPE and HDPE Technology
Tarja Korvenoja, Henrik Andtsjö, Klaus Nyfors, and Gunnar Berggren
14.15(1)
Process Description
14.15(1)
Advanced Process Control
14.21(1)
Capacities and Locations of Borstar PE Plants
14.23(1)
Borstar PE Products
14.23(1)
Process Economics
14.29(1)
Chapter 14.3. Chevron Phillips Slurry-Loop-Reactor Process for Polymerizing Linear Polyethylene
Mike Smith
14.31(1)
History
14.31(1)
Process Description
14.32(1)
Slurry-Loop Reactor
14.35(1)
Polymer Finishing and Packaging
14.37(1)
Utilities
14.37(1)
Technical Advantages of the Chevron Phillips Slurry-Loop Process for PE
14.38(1)
Summary
14.44(1)
Chapter 14.4. ExxonMobil High-Pressure Process Technology for LDPE
Charles E. Schuster
14.45(1)
Introduction
14.45(1)
Reaction Mechanism
14.46(1)
Process Overview Description
14.48(1)
LDPE versus LLDPE
14.53(1)
Product Capability Grade Slate
14.54(1)
LDPE Markets
14.54(1)
Strengths of ExxonMobil Technology
14.56(1)
Summary
14.57(1)
Reference
14.58(1)
Disclaimer
14.58(1)
Chapter 14.5. Polimeri Europa Polyethylene High-Pressure Technologies
Mauro Mirra
14.59(1)
Introduction
14.59(1)
Polimeri Europa Trademarks
14.60(1)
Chemistry and Thermodynamics
14.61(1)
High-Pressure Reactor Technologies
14.63(1)
Detailed Process Description
14.65(1)
Reactor Safety Discharge System
14.67(1)
Process Performance
14.69(1)
Plant Battery Limits
14.69(1)
Chapter 14.6. Basell Hostalen Technology for Bimodal HDPE Production
Dr. Reinhard Kuehl and Gijs ten Berge
14.71(1)
General Process Description
14.71(1)
Process Chemistry
14.71(1)
Hostalen Process Perspective
14.74(1)
Process Description
14.75(1)
Product Range and Applications
14.82(1)
Process Economics
14.85(1)
Chapter 14.7. Basell Lupotech G Technology for HDPE and MDPE Production
Cyrus Ahmadzade and Gijs ten Berge
14.87(1)
General Process Description
14.87(1)
Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics
14.87(1)
Lupotech G Process Perspective
14.88(1)
Process Description
14.89(1)
Product Specifications
14.92(1)
Process Economics
14.93(1)
Chapter 14.8. Basell Lupotech T Technology for LDPE and EVA-Copolymer Production
André-Armand Finette and Gijs ten Berge
14.95(1)
General Process Description
14.95(1)
Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics
14.95(1)
Lupotech T Process Perspective
14.102(1)
Process Description
14.104(1)
Product Specifications
14.110(1)
Process Economics
14.111(1)
Chapter 14.9. UNIPOL™ PE Gas-Phase Process: Delivering Value to the PE Industry
Mardee McCown Kaus
14.113(1)
Introduction
14.113(1)
History
14.114(1)
General Process Description
14.115(1)
Process Perspective
14.119(1)
Product and By-Product Specifications
14.120(1)
Wastes and Emissions
14.122(1)
Process Economics
14.124(1)
Chapter 14.10. NOVA Chemicals SCLAIRTECH™ LLDPE/HDPE Swing Technology
Keith Wiseman
14.131(1)
Introduction
14.131(1)
Chemistry and Catalysis
14.132(1)
Process Overview
14.134(1)
Advantages of the SCLAIRTECH Technology Platform
14.138(1)
Economics
14.140(1)
Product Capability
14.140(1)
Commercial Installations
14.143(1)
Summary
14.143(1)
Acknowledgment
14.144(1)
Disclaimer
14.144(1)
Part 15 Polyethylene Terephthalate
Chapter 15.1. UOP Sinco Solid-State Polymerization Process for the Production of PET Resin and Technical Fibers
Stephen M. Metro and James F. McGehee
15.3(1)
Introduction
15.3(1)
Melt-Phase Polymerization
15.5(1)
SSP Process Chemistry
15.6(1)
Crystallization of PET
15.8(1)
Sticking Tendency of PET
15.10(1)
Detailed Process Description
15.10(1)
Reactions of the Catalytic Nitrogen Purification System
15.13(1)
Oxidation of PET
15.14(1)
Process Variables
15.14(1)
Feed Properties
15.14(1)
Product Properties
15.16(1)
Product Yield
15.16(1)
Wastes and Emissions
15.16(1)
Utilities
15.16(1)
Equipment Considerations
15.17(1)
Commercial Experience
15.17(1)
References
15.18(1)
Part 16 Polypropylene
Chapter 16.1. Basell Spheripol Technology for PP Production
Maurizio Dorini and Gijs ten Berge
16.3(1)
General Process Description
16.3(1)
Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics
16.3(1)
Splieripol Process Perspective
16.13(1)
Process Description
16.13(1)
Process Economics
16.17(1)
Products and Applications
16.17(1)
Chapter 16.2. Basell Spherizone Technology for PP Production
Riccardo Rinaldi and Gijs ten Berge
16.21(1)
General Process Description
16.21(1)
Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics
16.2(1)
Spherizone Process Perspective
16.30(1)
Process Description
16.30(1)
Economics
16.37(1)
Products and Applications
16.37(1)
Chapter 16.3. Borstar Polypropylene Technology
Jouni Kivelä, Helge Grande, and Tarja Korvenoja
16.41(1)
Introduction
16.41(1)
Features of the Borstar PP Process Technology
16.43(1)
Process Description
16.44(1)
Production Cycle and Grade Transitions
16.47(1)
Advanced Process Control
16.48(1)
Catalyst
16.49(1)
Environment
16.49(1)
Operating Requirements
16.50(1)
Products
16.50(1)
Chapter 16.4. UNIPOL™ Polypropylene Process Technology
Barry R. Engle
16.57(1)
General UNIPOL PP Process Description
16.57(1)
Process Chemistry
16.60(1)
Process Perspective
16.62(1)
Products and By-Products
16.64(1)
UNIPOL PP Product Attributes Summary
16.65(1)
Wastes and Emissions
16.67(1)
Process Economics
16.68(1)
Chapter 16.5. Chisso Gas-Phase Polypropylene Process
Takeshi Shiraishi
16.71(1)
Technology Background and History
16.71(1)
Polymerization Mechanism and Polymer Type
16.71(1)
Process Features
16.74(1)
Process Description
16.76(1)
Safety and Environmental Considerations
16.78(1)
Product Capabilities
16.78(1)
Economics
16.79(1)
Reference Plants
16.79(1)
Part 17 Polystyrene
Chapter 17.1. BP/Lummus Technology for the Production of Expandable Polystyrene
Robert Stepanian
17.3(1)
Introduction
17.3(1)
Operating Plants
17.3(1)
Process Chemistry
17.3(1)
Process Description
17.4(1)
Feedstock Product Specifications
17.4(1)
Waste and Emissions
17.5(1)
Process Economics
17.5(1)
Summary of Process Features
17.7(1)
Reference
17.7(1)
Chapter 17.2. BP Lummus Technology for the Production of General-Purpose and High-Impact Polystyrenes
Robert Stepanian
17.9(1)
Introduction
17.9(1)
Operating Plants
17.10(1)
Process Chemistry
17.10(1)
Process Description
17.10(1)
Feedstock and Product Specifications
17.12(1)
Waste and Emissions
17.15(1)
Process Economics
17.15(1)
Summary of Process Features
17.15(1)
References
17.17(1)
Chapter 17.3. Polimeri Europa General-Purpose Polystyrene Process Technology
Francesco Pasquali and Riccardo Inglese
17.19(1)
Introduction
17.19(1)
Process Chemistry
17.20(1)
Description of the Process Flow
17.22(1)
Process Advanced Design Features
17.23(1)
Process Performance
17.24(1)
Plant Capacity
17.24(1)
Commercial Experience
17.25(1)
The Edistir GPPS Product Portfolio
17.25(1)
Chapter 17.4. Polimeri Europa Expandable Polystyrene Process Technology
Dario Ghidoni and Riccardo Inglese
17.27(1)
Introduction
17.27(1)
Process Chemistry
17.28(1)
Description of Process Flow
17.30(1)
Process Advanced Design Features
17.31(1)
Process Performance
17.32(1)
Plant Capacity
17.32(1)
Commercial Experience
17.32(1)
The Extir EPS Product Portfolio
17.32(1)
Chapter 17.5. Polimeri Europa High-Impact Polystyrene Process Technology
Francesco Pasquali and Franco Balestri
17.35(1)
Introduction
17.35(1)
Process Chemistry
17.36(1)
Description of Process Flow
17.37(1)
Process Advanced Design Features
17.38(1)
Process Performance
17.39(1)
Plant Capacity
17.39(1)
Commercial Experience
17.40(1)
The Edistir HIPS Product Portfolio 17.40
Part 18 Vinyl Chloride and Polyvinyl Chloride
Chapter 18.1. Vinnolit Vinyl Chloride and Suspension Polyvinyl Chloride Technologies
Ulrich Woike and Peter Kammerhofer
18.3(1)
Company Introduction
18.3(1)
Process Perspective
18.4(1)
Vinnolit Vinyl Chloride Monomer (VCM) Process
18.4(1)
Vinnolit Direct Chlorination Process
18.7(1)
Vinnolit Oxychlorination Process
18.12(1)
Vinnolit Thermal Cracking Process of 1,2-Dichloroethane to Vinyl Chloride
18.18(1)
Vinnolit Suspension Polyvinyl Chloride (S-PVC) Process
18.21(1)
Abbreviations and Acronyms
18.33(1)
References
18.35(1)
Chapter 18.2. Chisso Polyvinyl Chloride Suspension Process Technology and Vinyl Chloride Monomer Removal Technology
Seiichi Uchida
18.37
Chisso Polyvinyl Chloride Suspension Process Technology
18.37(1)
Chisso Vinyl Chloride Monomer Removal Process Technology
18.43
Index 1

An electronic version of this book is available through VitalSource.

This book is viewable on PC, Mac, iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and most smartphones.

By purchasing, you will be able to view this book online, as well as download it, for the chosen number of days.

A downloadable version of this book is available through the eCampus Reader or compatible Adobe readers.

Applications are available on iOS, Android, PC, Mac, and Windows Mobile platforms.

Please view the compatibility matrix prior to purchase.

Visa
Mastercard
American Express
Comodo
McAfee