Skip Navigation
List Price: $234.76

Rent Textbook

Select for Price
Add to Cart Free Shipping
There was a problem. Please try again later.

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

The Life of the Patriarch Tarasios by Ignatios Deacon (BHG1698): Introduction, Edition, Translation and Commentary,9780860786818

The Life of the Patriarch Tarasios by Ignatios Deacon (BHG1698): Introduction, Edition, Translation and Commentary

by
Edition: 1st
Format: Hardcover
Pub. Date: 9/28/2017
Publisher(s): Routledge
Availability: This title is currently not available.

Summary

The patriarch Tarasios holds a key position in the ending of the first period of Iconoclasm in Byzantium, with the seventh Oecumenical Council at Nicaea in 787. His Life forms an equally key source for the history and culture of the Byzantine world in the eighth and ninth centuries. This book provides a full introduction, a critical edition with English translation, and a detailed commentary and indexes for this important document. The introduction first places the text within the framework of other patriarchal biographies composed in the period c.850-950. Dr Efthymiadis then looks at Tarasios himself, as layman, patriarch, and saint, and provides a biographical sketch of the author of the Life, Ignatios the Deacon, together with a discussion of the date and reasons for the work's composition. In addition, this new text and translation makes more accessible a highly sophisticated example of Byzantine prose.

Table of Contents

A Note about Transliteration viii(1)
Preface ix(2)
List of Abbreviations xi(8)
Plates
xix
INTRODUCTION: THE HISTORICAL CONTEXT
3(50)
The ninth- and tenth-century Lives of Patriarchs: a hagiographical sub-genre?
3(3)
Tarasios as a historical figure
6(26)
a. Family and name
6(6)
b. Tarasios as a layman
12(1)
c. Tarasios as a prelate
13(12)
d. Tarasios' posterity
25(7)
Tarasios as a literary figure
32(1)
Tarasios as portrayed by Ignatios
33(5)
The author of the vita Tarasii
38(8)
The chronology and the purpose of composition of the vita Tarasii
46(7)
THE VITA. CRITICAL INTRODUCTION
53(14)
Manuscripts
53(8)
a. Direct tradition
53(7)
b. Fragmentary and abridged tradition
60(1)
Editions
61(1)
Transmission of the text
62(5)
TEXT
67(104)
Conspectus siglorum
67(2)
Text
69(102)
TRANSLATION
171(36)
1. Prologue
171(1)
2. Tarasios' memory fallen into oblivion
171(1)
3. The impossibility of praising Tarasios in a manner befitting his greatness
171(1)
4. His father, the just judge
172(1)
5. A story of evil spirits; women accused of murdering newly born children are acquitted thanks to Tarasios' father
172(1)
6. Thanks to his virtuous way of life and great learning, he is appointed to the office of protasecretis
173(1)
7. A priest before priesthood
173(1)
8. Patriarch Paul's resignation and his retirement to the monastery of Phloros
174(1)
9. The emperors meet Paul on his retirement inquiring of his reasons
174(1)
10. Paul's response: personal act of repentance for having succumbed to the heretics; nomination of Tarasios
174(1)
11. Paul's death
175(1)
12. The senate supports Tarasios
175(1)
13. The speech of the emperors before the senate
176(1)
14. Tarasios' hesitation; calls for the convocation of a synod
177(1)
15. Reaction of the army which remained faithful to Iconoclasm
177(1)
16. Tarasios' speech in the palace of Magnaura
178(1)
17. Tarasios' elevation to the patriarchal throne
178(1)
18. His virtues. Temperance and Vigilance
179(1)
19. Prayer without pause
179(1)
20. Humility; obliges his clergy to follow his own modest example
179(1)
21. Compassion; houses for the poor established
180(1)
22. Monthly contributions to the poor; distribution of food and winter clothing to the needy
180(1)
23. Wine offered to the poor on Easter day
180(1)
24. Tranquillity; founder of a monastery by the Bosporos
181(1)
25. Convocation of an ecumenical council
181(1)
26. Constantine V's followers disrupt the session in the church of Holy Apostles
182(1)
27. The council is dispersed; the rebels are demobilized
182(1)
28. The Second Nicene Council; representatives sent by the pope and the Eastern patriarchs
183(1)
29. The sessions of the Council
183(1)
30. The last session in the Palace of Magnaura
184(1)
31. Tarasios' mild treatment of iconoclastic clergy
184(1)
32. He instructs those misled over the doctrine of images
185(1)
33. Tarasios' measures against simony; homilies and commentary on Psalter
185(1)
34. Story of the spatharios accused of taking public revenues; seeks asylum at the church of Hagia Sophia
186(1)
35. Tarasios insists on the inviolability of the sanctuary
186(1)
36. The spatharios captured and carried to the palace
187(1)
37. Thanks to Tarasios' intervention the spatharios is acquitted
187(1)
38. Strict adherence to Canon Law
188(1)
39. Constantine VI sole ruler; the Moechian Affair
188(1)
40. Attempt to obtain Tarasios' assent to Constantine's second marriage
188(1)
41. Tarasios' brave refusal
189(1)
42. The response conveyed to the patriarch
189(1)
43. John gives support to the patriarch
190(1)
44. Constantine VI's plot continued; produces poison allegedly intended to either murder or drive him insane
190(1)
45. Constantine VI the new Herod; Tarasios likened to John the Baptist
191(1)
46. Constantine goes ahead with the illegitimate marriage
192(1)
47. Subsequent persecution of Tarasios and his entourage
192(1)
48. The purification of the five senses as exemplified by the virtues of Tarasios
193(1)
49. Tarasios' two-fold veneration of the martyrs; his homilies and his iconographical programme
194(1)
50. His iconographical programme; description of a series of painted martyrdoms
195(1)
51. Iconography of women martyrs; specific reference to the protomartyrs Stephen and Thekla
196(1)
52. Iconographical depication of Christ crucified
196(1)
53. Through the icon God's greatness is made visible
197(1)
54. The implacable stance of the heretics who regard icons as pagan idols
197(1)
55. The icon of Christ and the statue of Zeus
198(1)
56. Successor to the Holy Apostles
198(1)
57. Tarasios the new Moses guiding the people of the Church to the true faith
199(1)
58. Tarasios is likened to Old Testament figures
199(1)
59. Strong is his weakness; becomes ill in his old age, but continues to perform his sacerdotal duties
200(1)
60. Tarasios' ecstatic vision; his struggle against invisible forces--a sign of spiritual advancement
201(1)
61. Tarasios' death
201(1)
62. Emperor and city lament his death
202(1)
63. The Church mourns his loss
202(1)
64. The monks' grief; the people rush to touch his coffin
203(1)
65. The funeral in his monastery by the Bosporos
203(1)
66. His posthumous miracles; healing of women an issue of blood, of a one-eyed man and of a man possessed by an evil spirit
203(1)
67. Leo V's nightmare; foresees his own death
204(1)
68. His innumerable miracles
205(1)
69. His disciple's gratitude
205(1)
70. Dedicatory epilogue
206(1)
COMMENTARY
207(42)
Appendix 249(2)
Bibliography 251(14)
Grammatical Index 265(4)
Figures of Speech 269(2)
Citations 271(4)
Index nominum 275(2)
Index verborum 277(2)
Index of Manuscripts Cited 299(2)
General Index 301

An electronic version of this book is available through VitalSource.

This book is viewable on PC, Mac, iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and most smartphones.

By purchasing, you will be able to view this book online, as well as download it, for the chosen number of days.

A downloadable version of this book is available through the eCampus Reader or compatible Adobe readers.

Applications are available on iOS, Android, PC, Mac, and Windows Mobile platforms.

Please view the compatibility matrix prior to purchase.

Visa
Mastercard
American Express
Comodo
McAfee